6. VI. INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION AN OVERVIEW

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Quick Index Links:

1.Scope Of International commercial Arbitration In Trade And Commerce

2. Classification Of International Commercial Arbitration

3. Legislative Developments And Court Responses In Pakistan

INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION AN OVERVIEW

International commercial arbitration is a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) used to resolve disputes between parties engaged in international commercial transactions. It involves the use of an independent third party, called an arbitrator or a panel of arbitrators, who is appointed by the parties to hear and decide the dispute.

International commercial arbitration is typically governed by a set of rules agreed upon by the parties, such as the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Rules or the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Model Law. These rules provide a framework for the conduct of the arbitration proceedings, including the selection of arbitrators, the conduct of the hearing, and the issuance of the final award.

The main features of international commercial arbitration include:

  1. Choice of law: The parties to the dispute can choose the law that will be applied to the dispute, regardless of where the dispute arose.
  2. Choice of forum: The parties can choose the location of the arbitration hearing, regardless of where the dispute arose.
  3. Confidentiality: The proceedings and the final award are typically confidential.
  4. Enforceability: The final award is enforceable in most countries under the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards.
  5. Neutrality: The arbitrator or arbitrators are neutral, independent third parties who are selected by the parties based on their expertise in the subject matter of the dispute.

International commercial arbitration offers several advantages over traditional litigation in national courts, including:

  1. Speed and efficiency: International commercial arbitration proceedings can be completed more quickly and efficiently than court proceedings.
  2. Flexibility: The parties have more control over the process, including the choice of arbitrator, the location of the hearing, and the language of the proceedings.
  3. Expertise: The parties can select arbitrators with expertise in the subject matter of the dispute, which can lead to more informed and reasoned decisions.
  4. Confidentiality: The proceedings and the final award are typically confidential, which can help protect the parties’ commercial interests.
  5. Enforceability: The final award is enforceable in most countries under the New York Convention, which provides a reliable mechanism for enforcing the award.

In summary, international commercial arbitration is an effective method of resolving disputes between parties engaged in international commercial transactions. It offers several advantages over traditional litigation, including speed, efficiency, flexibility, expertise, confidentiality, and enforceability.

1. Scope Of International commercial Arbitration In Trade And Commerce

International commercial arbitration is an important mechanism for resolving disputes that arise in international trade and commerce. Its scope is wide-ranging and includes any dispute that may arise between parties engaged in international trade and commerce, such as:

  1. Sale of goods: Disputes arising from the sale of goods, including quality issues, delivery delays, and payment disputes.
  2. Service contracts: Disputes arising from service contracts, including performance issues, delays, and payment disputes.
  3. Construction projects: Disputes arising from construction projects, including design defects, delays, and payment disputes.
  4. Intellectual property: Disputes arising from the infringement or misuse of intellectual property rights, such as patents, trademarks, and copyrights.
  5. Joint ventures: Disputes arising from joint venture agreements, including disputes over management control, profit distribution, and breach of contract.
  6. International investment: Disputes arising from international investments, including disputes between foreign investors and host countries.

The scope of international commercial arbitration is not limited to these areas, but rather extends to any dispute that may arise in the course of international trade and commerce. International commercial arbitration is particularly useful in situations where the parties are from different countries and the dispute involves complex legal, cultural, and linguistic issues. The use of international commercial arbitration can help to ensure that disputes are resolved efficiently, fairly, and in a manner that is acceptable to all parties. It also promotes international trade and commerce by providing a reliable and predictable mechanism for resolving disputes that arise in cross-border transactions.

2. Classification Of International Commercial Arbitration

International commercial arbitration can be classified into different categories based on various factors, including the nature of the dispute, the legal framework, and the geographic location of the arbitration. Here are some common classifications of international commercial arbitration:

  1. Institutional vs. Ad Hoc Arbitration: Institutional arbitration refers to arbitration that is administered by an established arbitral institution, such as the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) or the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA). Ad hoc arbitration, on the other hand, is conducted without the involvement of an arbitral institution, and the parties are responsible for managing the arbitration process themselves.
  2. Domestic vs. International Arbitration: Domestic arbitration refers to arbitration that takes place within a single country, while international arbitration involves parties from different countries. International arbitration is governed by international treaties and conventions, as well as the laws of the country where the arbitration is taking place.
  3. Investor-State vs. Commercial Arbitration: Investor-state arbitration is a type of international arbitration that involves disputes between foreign investors and host countries. Commercial arbitration, on the other hand, involves disputes between private parties engaged in cross-border transactions.
  4. Seat of Arbitration: The seat of arbitration refers to the legal jurisdiction where the arbitration is taking place. The seat of arbitration determines the legal framework that governs the arbitration, as well as the enforceability of the arbitral award.
  5. Adversarial vs. Consensual Arbitration: Adversarial arbitration is a type of arbitration that is similar to traditional litigation, where the parties present their cases to a neutral arbitrator or panel, who then makes a binding decision. Consensual arbitration, on the other hand, is a more informal process that involves the parties working together to resolve the dispute with the help of a neutral third party.

These classifications are not mutually exclusive, and international commercial arbitration may involve elements of different categories. Understanding the different classifications can help parties to choose the most appropriate approach for their dispute and ensure that the arbitration process is conducted in an efficient and effective manner.

3. Legislative Developments and Court Responses in Pakistan

In Pakistan, the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has been encouraged through legislative developments and court responses. Here are some notable legislative and judicial developments related to ADR in Pakistan:

  1. Alternative Dispute Resolution Act 2017: The Alternative Dispute Resolution Act 2017 was enacted to provide a legal framework for the resolution of disputes through ADR mechanisms such as mediation, conciliation, and arbitration. The Act aims to promote the use of ADR in both civil and criminal cases and provides for the establishment of ADR centers and panels.
  2. Mediation Rules 2019: The Mediation Rules 2019 were introduced by the Lahore High Court to promote the use of mediation in civil cases. The rules provide a framework for the conduct of mediation proceedings and aim to encourage parties to reach a settlement through mediation.
  3. Supreme Court’s Use of Judicial Mediation: The Supreme Court of Pakistan has encouraged the use of judicial mediation as a means of resolving disputes. In 2015, the Court established the Centre for Alternative Dispute Resolution (CADR) to facilitate the resolution of cases through mediation and other ADR mechanisms.
  4. Use of Arbitration in Commercial Disputes: The use of arbitration to resolve commercial disputes has been encouraged through the enactment of the Arbitration Act 1940 and the recognition of the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards.
  5. Establishment of Commercial Courts: In 2019, the government of Punjab established commercial courts to handle commercial disputes. The courts are designed to provide a specialized forum for the resolution of commercial disputes and to expedite the resolution of such disputes.

Overall, the legislative and judicial developments in Pakistan reflect a growing recognition of the benefits of ADR and the need to provide a legal framework for its use. These developments are likely to encourage more parties to consider ADR as a means of resolving disputes, leading to a more efficient and effective justice system.

Other links:

Allama Iqbal Law College Website

Other Notes

Alternative Dispute Resolution

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